Zabaglione

Updated: Jul 16

Zabaglione is a classic Italian dessert full of love. It is usually prepared for couples on a date, to bring them a little bit more closer...

Don't wait and surprise your partner with this cloudy sweetness! Or don't tell the other half and eat just by yourself :)


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Zabaglione
Zabaglione

This recipe makes one portion to share.


Ingredients:


  • 3 organic egg yolks

  • 2tbsp of caster sugar

  • 2tbsp of whisky (you can also use Marsala or Cognac)

  • 75ml of double or whipping cream

  • few strawberries

  • few blueberries

  • chocolate wafer (optional)



Instructions:


  1. In the metal bowl, mix 3 egg yolks with 2tbsp caster sugar until sugar dissolves.

  2. Add 2tbsp of whisky and combine (You can also use Marsala or Cognac)

  3. Whisk Zabaglione over the Bain-marie for around 2 minutes, you can control the temperature by lifting the bowl (Be careful not to burn yourself, if the water is boiling to rapidly lower the stove temperature)

  4. Once Zabaglione turns pale yellow and consistency seems thick but still runny remove from the heat.

  5. In the separate bowl whisk 75ml of double or whipping cream.

  6. Gently fold in the whipped cream into the Zabaione (Do not mix or whisk)

  7. Transfer to the champagne glass, add summer fruits, and enjoy this beautiful dessert!

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Insight:


  • Egg yolk thickens at the temperature of 65C (149F) and sets at 70C (158F) while egg whites need 80C (176F) to coagulate.

  • By gently folding cream you preserve the air bubbles that were created during the whipping. Mixing, whisking and overfolding destroy this fragile structure.

  • Double and whipping cream foams thanks to the high amount of fat (30%-48%)


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Professional Chef Lukasz Babral

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And the best tasting still depends on a cook with taste''

 

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